Growing your personal brand on social media

Excellent advice from Pattie Lovett-Reid, chief financial commentator, CTV News – 5 ways to grow your personal brand on social media.

Watch Pattie’s interview with BNN’s The Street.

ANALYSIS: Are you narcissistic if you’re on social media?

That was the question posed to me at a family BBQ on the weekend. I found myself defending those of us who use social media to get a message out, build a brand, or purely for the entertainment value. Admittedly I’m a late adopter, having only joined Instagram this past week and Twitter a few years back. However, prior to engaging I asked experts in the field about ways to build a profile the right way, and I looked for some convincing that what I was doing was in fact a good thing to do.

Here is what I learned:

Social media is here to stay and employers hire people to ensure the person portrayed on the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram is the person they think they are hiring. It has happened more than once where a candidate has been disqualified for a job after a social media search unveiled a less than ideal candidate. The question then becomes how do you develop a social media brand that shines a light on you in a good way, and helps to build your brand, not destroy it?

There are some obvious rules to live by, such as never post when you are angry, if it is late at night or you don’t have all the facts.

Here are a few things I found helpful as I embarked on this brand building social journey.

1) You need to take ownership of your brand. And yes, we all have a brand so you have to decide what it is you want to be known for.

2) Stay on top of trends, understand how your business is evolving, and be aware of changes in rules and regulations that impact you and your industry.

3) Think very small steps. Your brand will grow over time. It isn’t about doing one big thing right, it’s about doing a lot of little things right. It can take years to build and just one Tweet to destroy it.

4) Always look for opportunities. It is okay to think outside of the box, but stay aligned to the goals of your organization. You don’t want to pursue a personal brand that is misaligned to the strategic initiatives of your organization. It is unlikely you will ever be bigger than the brand you work for.

5) Be authentic – authentic success, real success starts and ends with you being – you. Authenticity helps to build trust and in turn translates into your brand.

Finally, we all have to learn to say “no.” There is a tendency to want to say “yes” to every request that comes your way but by having the strength to say “no” allows you to walk away from the opportunities that don’t align with the personal brand you want portrayed.

When it comes to social media, I’m still a rookie and learning to proceed with caution. Accept it for what it is – a platform to get your message out, not a podium to hide behind, and finally don’t let it become a productivity killer.

Of course the best piece of advice I already knew intuitively – never post anything your Mom wouldn’t be proud of.

As the Chief Financial Commentator for CTV News, Pattie Lovett-Reid gives viewers an informed opinion of the Canadian financial climate. Follow her on Twitter @PattieCTV


About Social Influencer Marketing

I recently attended the Influencers 2.0 | ROI of the Influencer webinar presented by Social Media Today and sponsored by Act-On Software. I thought I’d share the webinar with you (click on the link above to listen; such good information!) as well as Act-On’s white paper…

Best Practices in Social Influencer Marketing

Social influencers have been around as long as society itself. A study on the 1940 U.S. Presidential election by sociologists Paul Lazarsfeld and Elihu Katz revealed that voters were more inclined to listen to the opinions of local leaders and political commentators than speeches made by the candidates themselves. In a subsequent book, Lazarsfeld and Katz introduced a two-step communication model which shows that ideas flow from mass media to opinion leaders, and then to a wider population. The opinion leaders themselves gain their influence through more elite media, as opposed to mainstream mass media.

Today’s social media fits this model precisely. For decades, retailers have seen increases in sales when trusted experts or celebrities endorse their products or services. Movies that get good reviews tend to sell more tickets than those with bad ones. Actors endorse beauty products, watches, clothing, more. Now, with social media woven into our daily lives, more and more business buyers and consumers are reading reviews, tweets, Facebook posts, and blog posts about products or services before they decide to buy.

Online social influence is powerful. Read the White Paper >> here.

The bottom line: Social influencers are a cost-effective, efficient way to raise awareness about YOU, your company, product, or services. People trust information from opinion leaders more than they trust what comes from your marketing department, so a business that does well with social influencers has an edge over its competitors. it’s important to remember that influencers are building their own reputation as they build yours (and in my opinion, this should include ,,. By giving them something to talk about that’s a good fit for their audience, you’re helping them remain interesting and relevant.